AN INTERESTING TRIPTYCH

I always enjoy the photos readers send for identification.  I recently received some of a very well-painted old Russian triptych.  It appears to be in untouched condition, still with its original varnish.  That makes the surface a bit dark, but it also is interesting to see icons that have not had the varnish removed — as long as it has not darkened too much.

Here it is:

(Photo courtesy of Gj. Bledar)

Let’s look more closely at the central image:

We can see that it is an icon of the New Testament Trinity type, showing Jesus enthroned in heaven, with Lord Sabaoth (God the Father) to his right, and the Holy Spirit as dove between their heads.  In the center is an orb surmounted by a cross, symbolizing their cosmic rule.  At left is Mary, called “Mother of God” in Eastern Orthodoxy, and to the right is John the Forerunner (the Baptist), both approaching the throne with their petitions on behalf of human believers.  Their presence — along with the saints in the outer two wings of the triptych — make it a New Testament Trinity in the Deisis form.  In the four corners are the symbols of the Four Evangelists, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. At the base is a seraph, and the odd kind of ring-shaped, winged angels called “Thrones.”

The saints in the two side panels are all quite notable saints:

Here is the left side:

Here is another view of the left:

The saints depicted are, from top left to right:

1.  Holy Venerable Makariy (Macarius)
2.  Holy Venerable Feodor (Theodore)
3.  Holy Venerable Evdokiya (Eudocia)
4.  Holy Great Martyr Georgiy (George)
5.  Holy Filipp, Metropolitan of Moscow (Philip)
6.  Holy Petr, Metropolitan of Moscow (Peter)
7.  Holy Aleksiy, Metropolitan of Moscow (Alexei)
8.  Holy Nikolai Chudotvorets (Nicholas the Wonderworker of Myra)
9.  Holy Apostle Andrey (Andrew the First-called)
10. The Holy Guardian Angel

And here is the right side:

And another view of the right side:

The saints depicted are (from top left):

11.   Holy Venerable Feodosiy Pecherskiy (Theodosius of the Pecherskaya Lavra)
12.  Holy Sergiy of Radonezh (Sergius)
13.  Holy Mariya Egipetskaya (Mary of Egypt)
14.  Holy Antoniy Pecherskiy (Anthony of the Pecherskaya Lavra)
15.  Holy Venerable Zosima Solovetskiy (Zosima of Solovetsk Monastery)
16.  Holy Savatiy Solovetskiy (Sabbatius of the Solovetsk Monastery)
17.  Holy Great Martyr Dimitriy (Demetrius)
18.  Holy Vasility Velikiy (Basil the Great)
19.  Holy Grigoriy Bogoslov (Gregory the Theologian)
20.  Holy Ioann Zlatoust (John Chrysostom)

You perhaps noted that there are some common linkings in this image of noted saints usually found together, often in their own icons.  They are:
1.  George and Demetrius, the warrior “great martyrs”;
2.  Zosima and Savatiy/Savvatiy of Solovetsk Monastery in the White Sea;
3.  Antoniy and Feodosiy of the Pecherskaya Lavra in Kiyev/Kiev;
4.  Petr, Aleksiy and Filipp, Metropolitans of Moscow (often shown with Metropolitan Iona);
5.  Basil the Great, Gregory the Theologian, and John Chrysostom, commonly known as the “Three Hierarchs.”

On the reverse of the central panel, a “Golgotha Cross” (Голгофский Крест / Golgofskiy Krest) is painted:

I have discussed the Golgotha Cross in earlier postings.  The abbreviations on this one are:

ΙC XC
ISUS KHRISTOS [Old Believer form]
“JESUS CHRIST”

Then the abbreviation for СЫНЪ БОЖIЙ /SUIN” BOZHIY —
“Son of God.”

К     Т
K, for Kopie — “spear,” and T for T for Trost’— “reed.”  The former identifies the lance at left, and the latter the long reed at right, bearing a sponge at its top.  Note that in old icon inscriptions “T” often looks rather like an “M,” so that is a very helpful tip.

НИКА
NIKA
“[He] Conquers.”

Then come the letters

МЛ  РБ

They abbreviate

МЕСТО ЛОБНОЕ РАЙ БЫСТЬ
MESTO LOBNOE RAI BUIST’
“The Place of the Skull has become Paradise.”

And

Г  Г
ГОРА ГОЛГОФА
GORA GOLGOFA
“Hill [of] Golgotha”

Finally, by the skull of Adam, we see

Г  А
ГОЛОВА АДАМА
GOLOVA ADAMA
“[The] SKULL [literally “head”] [of] ADAM”

My thanks to Gj. Bledar for permission to use the photos of his icon.

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